Accomodating being

All the bottles we selected contains only wines from indigenous grapes of our island, for a sensory experience that is connected with the territory that you will live during your stay.

Our cuisine offers simple dishes, designed to give value to the ingredients we use.

Pregnancy discrimination involves treating a woman (an applicant or employee) unfavorably because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) forbids discrimination based on pregnancy when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, fringe benefits, such as leave and health insurance, and any other term or condition of employment.

The following are some basic tips for working with Deaf/HH students in your course.

It is important to keep in mind that research and practical experience prove time and again that accommodations like those described below for Deaf/HH students (and most accommodations made for all students with disabilities) not only benefit the intended student(s), but all students.

NOTE: The following tips were compiled by the Learning Needs & Evaluation Center (LNEC).

Those with additional questions regarding deaf/hard of hearing students or students with disabilities in a class and those interested in other resources related to persons with disabilities should contact the Learning Needs and Evaluation Center/Disability Services Office at 243-5180, [email protected], or visit their website at

Management told the employee however, that it would consider what reasonable accommodations could be made to its dress code policy.

The ADA Amendments Act of 2008 makes it much easier to show that a medical condition is a covered disability. Harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment or when it results in an adverse employment decision (such as the victim being fired or demoted).

The harasser can be the victim's supervisor, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or someone who is not an employee of the employer, such as a client or customer.

Over the years the company had routinely accommodated her wish to wear a while working at the front counter and was terminated. The court, holding that the company had a duty to accommodate plaintiff’s religious practice and could not rely on perceived customer preferences to establish that accommodating plaintiff would cause it undue hardship, granted summary judgment against the employer. The general information contained herein is intended for informational purposes only.

after she was hired, and told management that she eventually planned to wear a full headpiece, with only her eyes showing. It is not intended to be, and should not be construed as, legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances.